Can cannabis enhance your meditation journey?

Can cannabis enhance your meditation journey?

Cannabis was first used in China and India as far back as 10 000 years B.C. It since has been used for many different purposes one of them being: rituals and religious practices. We can find writing about it in the Vedas and the famous Hindu god called Shiva is also associated with the cannabis plant very often. Cannabis being his plant of predilection. Cannabis has been involved in religious or spiritual rituals all over the world, from ancient Greece to China to the Scandinavian Vikings communities.

For most, it is still hard to describe the exact meaning of those rituals. Although, there are clear pieces of evidence of it being used, in this context, at many points in human history.

Another old spiritual practice is meditation. The oldest written record of meditation dates to 1500 B.C. in Buddhist, Hindu and Taoist, China spiritual practices. Meditation is a technique used to achieve mindfulness and consist of focusing our minds on a specific thought, activity or object. People use this habit to train their minds to be more attentive, aware, calm, stable and have deeper control over their emotions. Meditation can also be used for health purposes. It has been proven to help reduce anxiety, stress, fatigue, and even blood pressure.

With the buzz surrounding recreational and medicinal cannabis legalization, some people started to ask themselves if cannabis could help expand their meditation experiences. Cannabis has also been linked to reducing blood pressure and is a powerful antidepressant. Cannabis and meditation seem to compliment each other when you observe where they both originated and how they impact our bodies and minds.

Yoga studios involving the intake of cannabis are already open in Las Vegas. No scientific studies have been made on the topic so far. Since the meditation journey is such a personal and mystical one, it can be hard to evaluate what can result from its combination with cannabis.

When talking about her own experience combining meditation and marijuana, Jessie Gill, a registered nurse who specializes in medical marijuana, says this: "I reflected. The vibrations of the bowls had penetrated my psyche, combining with my high. And while I wouldn't yet be able to identify all the benefits of two lauded practices—smoking weed and meditating—my marrying of the two for under an hour intensified my conviction for both."

If you are interested in trying this mix always be careful with the dosage. I wouldn't recommend it for someone who has little to no experience with cannabis. It is important to know our limits and to be in control. The goal in this new innovative "practice" is to achieve higher levels of calm, awareness and control. Being under the influence of a psychoactive substance is not a good idea for everyone.

Keep in mind that meditation on its own has worked for millions of people. It takes time to master this practice but starting slow and being constant will slowly get you there.